Camelhide

From RimWorld Wiki
Revision as of 18:25, 10 February 2023 by Hordes (talk | contribs) (→‎Analysis)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Camelhide

Camelhide

Tanned, dried, scraped camel skin. Good at temperature regulation in hot climates.

Base Stats

Type
TextileLeather
Stuff Category
Leathery
Market Value
2.3 Silver
Stack Limit
75
Mass
0.03 kg
Beauty
-4
HP
60
Flammability
100%
Rotatable
False
Path Cost
15

Stat Modifiers

Beauty Factor
×1.3
Work To Make Factor
×1
Work To Build Factor
×1
Max Hit Points
×1.3
Flammability
×1
Armor - Sharp
×0.81
Armor - Blunt
×0.24
Armor - Heat
×1.5
Insulation - Cold
+16 °C (28.8 °F)
Insulation - Heat
+24 °C (43.2 °F)
Technical
defName
Dromedary_Leather
Color
(204,180,150)


Camelhide is a type of leather produced when a cook butchers a dromedary or an alpaca at a butcher table.

Acquisition

The following animals provide Camelhide.

  • Animal Leather Yield
    Alpaca 40
    Dromedary 84
  • Analysis

    Camelhide is one of many textiles with stats almost identical to plainleather, only diverging in having better heat insulation and slightly higher market value and beauty factor. In this way, it can be considered the heat focused counterpart to Bluefur

    As it is 6-way tied for the 11th most protective textile in the game, it is largely irrelevant as protective clothing after the very early game. Yet camelhide's heat insulation is amazing, the second best against heat (in a 3-way tie). So unlike comparably protective textiles, it can retain utility in hot biomes into the mid-game. Later on, devilstrand is as insulative and significantly more protective. Therefore, growing devilstrand should be made a priority in these biomes. If heat isn't an issue, then other leathers should be used before devilstrand whenever possible.

    For use in furniture, it only has a slightly improved beauty factor than other common textiles. However, its mid-game redundancy as clothing makes it a decent choice for improving furniture beauty. Yet wools are superior for beauty and reasonably common, limiting the long-term utility of camelhide.

    Gallery